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Jim Luthi  Q & A Colorado Hometown Weekly

Age: 53

Family: Married with two grown children

How long have you lived in Erie: about 4 years

Professional background: I (worked) for the city of Westminster as a landscape architect. I spent almost 20 years working in all aspects of land planning, landscape architecture, and land development. Having spent a majority of my working career with local home builders I was blessed to receive guidance and mentoring from some of the most accomplished in the field.

Political/community experience: None

Education: Bachelor’s of landscape architecture, Texas Tech University

According to U.S. Census Bureau data, Erie’s population increased by 40% from April 2010 to July 2018. What factors do you think the town should consider as it continues to grow?

The town has an overall master plan in place. While this plan can be adjusted to accommodate changing needs, the overall intent should be maintained. We need to achieve balance between residential, commercial and open space. We need to make the right decisions and make sure what is planned is what we can live with. Development and zoning codes are put in place as a guide for the town and development applications to follow. Any deviation needs to be seriously considered before any decisions are made. We must have the backbone available to continue the current expansion of Erie. We won’t be able to depend solely on developer fees and their service expansions. Erie will, at some point, be required to maintain what has been built. As our population increases, we will have to pay close attention to the details of new subdivisions and commercial applications.

In light of the passage last year of Senate Bill 181, what changes do you think, if any, Erie should make to its oil and gas policy and regulations?

The rules committee is still in the process of creating their final requirements. Having approvals at the local level is a good because it allows Erie to put its citizens’ health and safety first. Cooperation between land owners, oil and gas and the town will be imperative going forward. I believe workable solutions can be attained and benefit all parties involved. One-sided cessation will not solve the issues. It will, however, close valuable lines of communication.

In the wake of the recent fraud to which the town fell victim, what financial oversight measures would you like to be considered or implemented?

I believe there were safeguards in place that were not correctly followed. The town should have more interaction with their contractors. Applications for payment should be made in writing by a designated representative of the contractor. The application should go through a chain of approvals beginning with the town’s consultant (if applicable). Town staff should then confirm the application. I know in my day-to-day activities’ payment approvals have to go through two to five approvals depending on the amount. If I don’t follow protocol then I am held accountable.

 

Friday, March 13, 2020 10:22 AM

Jim Luthi Q & A Colorado Hometown Weekly

Jim Luthi  Q & A Colorado Hometown Weekly

Age: 53

Family: Married with two grown children

How long have you lived in Erie: about 4 years

Professional background: I (worked) for the city of Westminster as a landscape architect. I spent almost 20 years working in all aspects of land planning, landscape architecture, and land development. Having spent a majority of my working career with local home builders I was blessed to receive guidance and mentoring from some of the most accomplished in the field.

Political/community experience: None

Education: Bachelor’s of landscape architecture, Texas Tech University

According to U.S. Census Bureau data, Erie’s population increased by 40% from April 2010 to July 2018. What factors do you think the town should consider as it continues to grow?

The town has an overall master plan in place. While this plan can be adjusted to accommodate changing needs, the overall intent should be maintained. We need to achieve balance between residential, commercial and open space. We need to make the right decisions and make sure what is planned is what we can live with. Development and zoning codes are put in place as a guide for the town and development applications to follow. Any deviation needs to be seriously considered before any decisions are made. We must have the backbone available to continue the current expansion of Erie. We won’t be able to depend solely on developer fees and their service expansions. Erie will, at some point, be required to maintain what has been built. As our population increases, we will have to pay close attention to the details of new subdivisions and commercial applications.

In light of the passage last year of Senate Bill 181, what changes do you think, if any, Erie should make to its oil and gas policy and regulations?

The rules committee is still in the process of creating their final requirements. Having approvals at the local level is a good because it allows Erie to put its citizens’ health and safety first. Cooperation between land owners, oil and gas and the town will be imperative going forward. I believe workable solutions can be attained and benefit all parties involved. One-sided cessation will not solve the issues. It will, however, close valuable lines of communication.

In the wake of the recent fraud to which the town fell victim, what financial oversight measures would you like to be considered or implemented?

I believe there were safeguards in place that were not correctly followed. The town should have more interaction with their contractors. Applications for payment should be made in writing by a designated representative of the contractor. The application should go through a chain of approvals beginning with the town’s consultant (if applicable). Town staff should then confirm the application. I know in my day-to-day activities’ payment approvals have to go through two to five approvals depending on the amount. If I don’t follow protocol then I am held accountable.

 


Sunday, March 1, 2020 6:40 AM

NASCAR at Miners

Well it's NASCAR season and the Auto Club 400 is on this Sunday at 1:30!!! I was planning on watching it at Miner's there on Briggs Street and couldn't think of a better way to meet Erie race fans...and non-race fans too!!!  I'll get there about 1-ish and save some tables. We can watch the race and discuss the Town.


Wednesday, January 29, 2020 12:08 PM

My thoughts on the BOT Meeting January 28, 2020

In last night's very late session The Town of Erie is looking in to becoming a Home Rule municipality and leaving it's Statutory status.
In short, Home Rule municipalities have all the powers granted to statutory municipalities, however, a home-rule municipalities have the same power over their own local affairs as the state government has over statewide affairs. THIS INCLUDES ENFORCEMENT OF NEW LOCAL SALES/ USE TAXES
Whereas, under the current Statutory status, municipalities possess only those powers expressly granted to them by the state Legislature or that naturally flow from granted powers. A statutory municipality has no authority to pass an ordinance that contradicts state law.
As we have seen recently, giving The Town more money would be financial death sentence. They can't control their spending now. Also, once Erie begins to collect local taxes, there will have to be an entire new administration and facilities to collect and spend YOUR TAX MONEY.
Hope they don't build any new Administration Buildings in Old Town- that will definitely impact the parking.


Wednesday, January 15, 2020 1:45 PM

Jim Luthi Announces Run For Erie Board of Trustees


Committee to Elect Jim Luthi
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